In many states, a convicted felon cannot vote, serve on a juryIn many states, a convicted felon cannot vote, serve on a jury

Feb 15, 2024

In many states, a convicted felon cannot vote, serve on a jury, or hold public office until civil rights have been restored. Some states expand that to include other “civil disabilities” that may continue long after a criminal sentence has been served, such as prohibiting ex-felons from possessing a firearm or working in a job that has a licensing requirement (such as a real estate agent). In the United States, an estimated 3.9 million citizens, or one in 50 adults, have currently or permanently lost the ability to vote because of a felony conviction. In some states, the courts have granted inmates a number of civil rights through a slow process of legal review. In many other states, inmates have no rights at all and, after they are released, many former inmates only regain their rights if they apply for and are granted clemency. 

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